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Mark Zuckerberg ‘Twitter killer’ Threads enrages users over mass data collection: 'Near zero privacy'

Meta’s Twitter rival “Threads” has already enraged social media after it was discovered that the new “sharing with text” platform asks users to hand over even more data than its competitor, including financial and health information.

Reporter Michael Shellenberger warned that the new creation from Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg has “near zero privacy” and said Congress must either break up Meta or mandate transparency as a condition of the company’s Section 230 protections.

“Mark Zuckerberg says he’s not thinking about monetization of users on his Twitter clone, Threads, but that’s a lie. His business model is selling our data to advertisers,” he tweeted Thursday.

Weighing in on the controversy, Stephen Miller, a Senior Advisor to former President Donald Trump, tweeted, “If you are looking to have your speech censored and your data pillaged, then Mark Zuckerberg has an app for you.”

“Think seriously for one second about how @elonmusk bringing back banned accounts from old Twitter was a bigger and much longer discussed controversy in the media than Instagram actually serving as a network for pedophiles to find child porn,” he wrote.

According to the “Data Linked to You” page found on Apple devices, the following information may be collected by Threads and linked to your identity:

TWITTER ACCUSES META OF STEALING TRADE SECRETS WITH NEW APP THREADS, THREATENS LEGAL ACTION 

Health and Fitness information

Messages: Emails, SMS or MMS, other in-app messages

Photos and Videos

App info and performance: Crash logs, diagnostics and other app performance data

Twitter, in comparison, does not ask users to fork over health and fitness data, financial information, sensitive information and “other data.”

HOW FACEBOOK SECRETLY COLLECTS YOUR INFORMATION EVEN IF YOU HAVEN’T SIGNED UP

Under EU law, health data requires an extremely high standard of explicit consent to be processed to comply with the General Data Protect Regulation (GDPR). Additionally, the app’s ability to import personal data from Instagram creates an additional legal headache, described by some tech journalists as a “privacy nightmare.”

Earlier this year, Meta was fined nearly €377 million for failing to provide a valid legal reason under GDPR to run behavioral advertisements on the company’s array of apps.  

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