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Thursday, April 11, 2024

Your ChatGPT account and conversations could be for sale on the dark web

AI is sweeping across industries like a wave, opening up new frontiers and leaving regulators scrambling in its wake. It’s easy to see why – with tools like ChatGPT on the rise, the line between humans and machines blurs more each day. However, just when we thought we had our hands full with job displacement debates and drafting digital policies, a new issue sneaks up – ChatGPT accounts stolen and traded on the dark web.

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Some crafty cyber thieves have found a new market, not for gold or diamonds, but for AI-powered personas. These stolen ChatGPT accounts are changing hands in shadowy digital auctions, fueling the rise of cybercrime and identity theft.

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MORE: DON’T FALL FOR THESE FAKE, MALWARE-PRODUCING CHATGPT SITES

Is OpenAI at fault?

Now, before anyone starts pointing fingers, OpenAI isn’t the one leaving the doors unlocked. No, the breach is happening closer to home, right on our devices. Cybercriminals are using malware to trick their way in, sometimes hidden in seemingly harmless links or attachments or slipping through the cracks in outdated software. Once they’re in, they can access all sorts of data, including ChatGPT account details. But as every cloud has a silver lining, so does this digital dilemma. There are ways to navigate this storm without going under.

MORE: HOW HACKERS ARE USING CHATGPT TO CREATE MALWARE TO TARGET YOU

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Clear old ChatGPT conversations

You can also clear old ChatGPT history. Here’s how you can do that:

How to clear old ChatGPT conversations

2) Place a fraud alert

Contact one of the three major credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian or TransUnion) and request a fraud alert to be placed on your credit file. This will make it more difficult for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name without verification.

3) Check your credit reports

5) Invest in identity theft protection 

Identity Theft protection companies can monitor personal information like your home title, Social Security number (SSN), phone number, and email address and alert you if it is being sold on the dark web or being used to open an account.  They can also assist you in freezing your bank and credit card accounts to prevent further unauthorized use by criminals.

One of the best parts of using some services is that they might include identity theft insurance of up to $1 million to cover losses and legal fees and a white glove fraud resolution team where a US-based case manager helps you recover any losses.

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Person typing on their laptop with graphics of keylock and a world atlas.

There are many ways to keep your data safe from malware, including two-factor authentication and keeping software up to date. (CyberGuy.com)

7) Enable two-factor authentication 

9) Request an “Identity Protection Pin” from the IRS

By requesting an “Identity Protection Pin” from the IRS, individuals can effectively deter any attempts of unauthorized tax filing using their personal information.

10) Strengthen your passwords 

Regularly update your operating system, antivirus software, web browsers, and other applications to ensure you have the latest security patches and protections.

MORE: BEWARE OF THE FAKE CHATGPT PLUGIN THAT’S STEALING YOUR FACEBOOK LOGIN

12) Create alias email addresses 

Kurt’s key takeaways

So, there we have it. The wild, wild web isn’t just about cat videos and online shopping anymore. AI’s making a splash, and with ChatGPT’s user accounts being swiped, it seems like we’re getting a taste of the future, albeit a slightly bitter one.

The good news, though? We’re far from defenseless. Unique and complex passwords, two-factor authentication, a healthy skepticism of suspicious emails, and regular device updates are just some of the weapons in our digital armory.

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